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20121027
20121104
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who were heavily subsidized by the government prospered while black farmers struggled to eke out a living, practicing subsistence farming or as laborers for white concerns. man: people were not able to make a living in this economy, and that was the whole purpose of the economy. we saw a situation that necessarily undermined agricultural production and livelihood systems. why? because those areas of south africa designated as bantustans were in fact labor reserves. we see a compression of space. we see high-population densities on marginal lands, and proximity to johannesburg and pretoria-- the main industrial center of south africa. and so those areas served as effective labor reserves, meaning that if we can keep the people in those areas from garnering a real livelihood, keep them structurally dependent on migration, then we have a large labor pool. narrator: there was a distinct geography of apartheid, a geography of separateness based upon race. as the gnment n to redress these injusces in 1994 and '95, land reform brought euphoric times. woman: so really today, i don't know
by the government they don't trust the government and we need less of the head butting and yes the city needs money but we can't do it on the backs of small business and the threats to residents and i completely oppose the meters on sundays and late nights. >> mr. crowley. >> in district seven i think it's necessary to dismiss this idea all together and let's not forget the holidays and they hit them as well. a one size approach doesn't fit this and i suggest the parking lots at the ball field and we do dynamic pricing and that is one solution that is dense and know they're going to pay for parking and looking for solutions to fit their car in for free. only in areas where there is the retail wrap that should happen but in district seven it's a disincentive for the merchants. >> we are good at shooting the goose and in the foot and muni says we have a deficit let's gouge the drivers. are you going to drive anywhere? no. you're going somewhere else and where is that revenue that we need? and by the way give free passes to youth and expand it from there, so we gill the gooses and shoot the drive
'sin sense--.ere's beenn not by the ivorian government, but it's peoe aring (some forest, i lied.nswees each year, we have problemsiv . feeding ourselves. narrator: and from neighboring countriese came to the sparsely-populatedt to find work on the plantations or obtain land. (animals calling ) ( man speaking french ) translator: we come here from the region of sakassou. auame ouurr. when he arrived, he went to see the bakwes, the natives. he explained to them why he had come and what he wanted. they were very nice. they gave him some fort- very good forest, in fact. that's how we ended up here. narrator: nipy is a village in the southwest-- the land of the bakwe people. ( man speaking french ) translator: we received our brothers from neighboring countries-- burkina faso, guinea, mali, the baule from other parts of the ivory coast-- who we allowed to settle, who are planters and who live here side by side with us. narrator: various ethnic groups migrated from the poorer northern savannas. many were baules, originally from the center of the country, but also the senufos, malinkes and lobis
think there is a lot of waste there government. we just talked about the hetch hetchy matter and building was supposed to be $140 million, but it was actually $65 million over budget. the department of public works doesn't even have all of its receipts. the bond oversight committee is supposed to be have access to those receipts. they can't get them. so we ce[6ud money is not accounted for. we found waste in the arts commission, which the controllers office confirmed and the civil grand jury confirm and we also found waste in various other departments. and this board of supervisors needs people on it who will actually ask those questions. thank you. we have a couple other candidates who wanted to jump in here. mr. davis and miss selby. >> after $1.5 billion in public service sector cuts in san francisco since 2008, since our budget crisis, we can't balance our budget going forward on cuts alone. we have got to look for revenue with muni failing and unmaintained parks we need a comprehensive, aggressive revenue strategy. i was one of the activists and advocates who helped t
the association of bay area governments. our housing element of you are general plan calls for 60% of new housing to be affordable housing. we need to address this issue head-on and build the affordable housing that this community and this city desperately needs. how do we do that? i think we need to go back to the ballot with an affordable housing bond. we have haven't passed one in san francisco since 1996. we have an opportunity this fall with prop c to support the first permanent dedicated stream of funding for affordable housing. it's on the november ballot. and i encourage everybody to vote for it. on the ballot as well is a business tax restructure to bring in new revenue for the city and many millions of dollars from that, about 13 will be dedicated to the affordable housing so we can ramp up development of affordable housing in san francisco. >> thank you. mr. everett? >> providing affordable housing is a central and extremely important issue. that being said, we also need to look at how we deal with public housing within the city and county of san francisco. i grew up in section 8 hou
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5